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SATURDAY, OCT. 18 : TREE PLANTATION VISIT

Meet Lowell DeMond and learn about the transformation he has stimulated on a 32-hectare woodland that was burned over in 1956. This 244-m-wide by 1.6-km-long property contains a mixed forest of hundreds of planted trees, a small Christmas tree lot, and two brooks.. read more

“Time to move biodiversity and wildlife to Environment”

clearcutIn an opinion piece in the Oct 4 Chronicle Herald, Jamie Simpson cites the clearcutting of environmentally sensitive Western crown Lands as evidence that responsibility for protecting for biodiversity and wildlife should be moved from the N.S. Dept. Natural Resources to N.S. Dept. of Environment. Read more

THURSDAY, OCT. 2: A LIGHTKEEPING JOURNEY

lighthouseChris Mills will explore the history of Canadian lighthouses, interwoven with his own lightkeeping experiences as an assistant and acting Principal Lightkeeper on 11 light stations in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and British Columbia. Read more

Mushroom Foray Sep 26-28, 2014

mushroomWhy not have an outdoor WILD MUSHROOM experience? The Nova Scotia Mycological Society is holding its 6th annual foray in Wallace, NS beginning Friday, Sept 26 through Sunday, Sep 28. All are welcome. This event is geared to anyone interested in mushrooms and/or natural history. See the full program, registration and accommodation details at nsmushrooms.org.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 27: CABIN LAKE TRAIL WALK

With Pat Leader, visit historic Cabin Lake Trail, developed and maintained by the Halifax North West Trails Association (HNWTA). It leads to and around Cabin Lake, both of which are part of Hemlock Ravine Park. Details on our Walks and Talks Page

HFN’s Archived Newsletters are still relevant

newsletterRead about The Cheticamp raised Bog – before if was flooded for the Wreck Cove Hydroelectric Project – some common edible and poisonous mushrooms in Nova Scotia, and how to recognize ten common N.S. grasses, all in July/Aug 1976 issue of the Halifax Field Naturalist! View Archived Newsletters for those items and lots more.

DNR and the disappearing science

forest clearcut A Halifax Media Co-op article by Robert Devet asks if our forests are “not a renewable resource after all” and highlights nutrient supply issues as a matter of concern. “Poor soils, acid rain and a history of clearcutting make Nova Scotia’s forests vulnerable to aggressive harvesting practices, a biologist argues. Yet the Department of Natural Resources is not releasing a scientific report that identifies where not to clearcut.” View Article

Tuesday, Sep. 9: Why Forests Matter

forestsAn evening of discussion about forests, their influence on society and why they matter to Canadians. A Nature Conservancy of Canada Event at Pier 21. $8 admission, students free. Details

Thursday Sept. 4: Native Wild Bees

Bee decline is a worrying phenomenon. In our first evening meeting for the fall season, Andony Melathopoulos will introduce us to the key Nova Scotian species, provide a glimpse of their natural history, and talk about what we need to do to ensure their conservation. 7:30 p.m. at the Nova Scotia Museum of Natural History on Summer Street in Halifax. All welcome. Read more

Prospect Head, Caramelized White Spruce

ProspectOn our joint Halifax Field Naturalists/Nova Scotia Wildflower Society walk at Prospect Head Nature Reserve yesterday (July 12, 2014), we noted extensive browning of vegetation which was attributed to salt burn associated with sea spray from Tropical Storm Arthur 8 days before, preceded and followed by hot, dry weather. At one point, a few of us paused and wondered about a strong smell of caramelized sugar that seemed to come from a white spruce.. read more

SATURDAY, JUL. 12, 2014: PROSPECT SCENIC COASTAL HIKE

Peter Webster will lead this scenic hike which starts and finishes at the Inner Gulf Island end of the coastal trail and goes toward Prospect. Read more.

SMU plans threaten precious woodland

precious oak woodland in Halifax According to the SMU Campus Master Plan, St. Mary’s University plans to construct a large buildling (the “Oaks Complex”) in the red oak woodland by The Oaks in south-end Halifax. This remnant natural woodland with elements of old growth forest (multiaged oaks, snags, decaying fallen trees) & abundant witch hazel, indian pipe, mocassin orchid and bird life would be decimated… View Photo